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Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 12/15/2016 - 03:39

By Hugo Craft-Stanley

On Nov. 25, the Goldsmiths Zine Society held an event at St. James Hatcham Church to celebrate the launch of six new zines from Goldsmiths students and societies. “Writersbloc” is the first of several collaborative zines this year from the Creative Writing Society, featuring poetry and prose by their members. Other zines presented include “Fall(ing)” by Sian Cannell, presenting her poems and images; Nell Whitney’s zine, featuring her photographs alongside snippets of text; “The Language of My Plants” by Andrea Grieb, collecting poems and photographs in a collage format; “Chameleon” by Hugo Craft-Stanley, exploring the theme of creativity through prose and collage; and “Meditations”, featuring poetry by Joseph Phillips and illustrations from Rebecca Reading.  

There were live performances from musicians Eleanor Philpot, Hol, Charles Vaughan and Jack Emsden, Torrente, Isabella Crowther and Hugo C-Stanley as well as DJ Lizzie Walsh on the decks. Their styles were varied, from Hugo’s atmospheric piano music to Isabella’s singer-songwriter soul to Torrente’s electronic grooves. The evening also featured several poetry readings, often with an exciting impromptu atmosphere and a charged delivery that drew in the audience.

In all, the event was a truly exciting showcase of the creative output of

Greening Goldsmiths advertisement
photo credit: Nicola Hogan

Goldsmiths SU have recruited an Environmental and Ethnical Officer, Yusuf Siddiqui. Yusuf is a third year International Studies student and can be reached at eandeofficer@goldsmithssu.org. Yusuf and Greening Goldsmiths would like to remind students that our overarching aim is to provide students with a campus that not only looks good and provides students with an environment that is conducive to teaching, learning and research but is also sustainable and ethical in its operations. Any student wanting to get involved in helping to “green” our campus, can do so by participating in any of the project listed below.

1. Gardening.

Students looking for a therapeutic and environmentally friendly activity can join the Goldsmiths Allotment. The allotment is managed by Dr. Ros Gray and members can have their own plot on which to grow anything they like or be part of the community plot. For more details, see their Facebook Page or contact R.Gray@gold.ac.uk

2. Energy Detectives.

Students can become an Energy Detective by accessing the Energy Detective smart phone web appat edetect.gold.ac.uk and recording where and when they see energy being wasted across campus. After registering their login details, a drop down menu of the list of

"A Tale of Two Cities" graphic courtesy of the event Facebook page.

With the start of October came not only an influx of Halloween decorations and a drop in temperatures, but also the beginning of Black History Month. Goldsmiths, as well as the Student Union, have planned a series of events for the month. We’re now halfway through October and a few of these events have already successfully occurred.

These events included a launch event on October 3 and a screening of the 2015 documentary “Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution” on October 12. Also, on October 13, Goldsmiths held a full-day conference called “Challenging the Silence in Higher Education: Race & Racism in the Academy” with the university, the student union, the London School of Economics, and their student union.

While these events might have passed, there are still many more to come. Monday the 17th will see an event called “The Great Debate” taking place, co-hosted by the Student Union, the Afro-Caribbean Society and the Pan-African Society.

“The Great Debate Tour (GDT) is the first and largest national debate forum targeted at cultural communities on university campuses across the UK”, says the event’s Facebook page. “The tour is a celebration of diversity and heritage as well as

Second SWSS Art Show
Photo Credit: Alice Garwood

“So, what is, um, this?” The girl, who had only swerved toward my table in order to avoid the gentle but insistent members of The Gideon International handing out copies of the New Testament across from me, gestured to the sign hanging behind my head. Sex Worker Solidarity Society it read, clear in white and red. What was less clear, then and perhaps now, was the meaning and the purpose behind such a society.

My name is Charlie Wright, and I am the second and current president of the Sex Worker Solidarity Society (SWSS for brevity). I mention that I am the second president because we are a new society, indeed the first society of our kind. This means that we have no blueprint for activity and are forging new ground, if you want to be romantic, or muddling along as best we can if you want to be realistic.

The point of us, in a sentence, is to be a focal point and space for sex worker support and sex workers’ rights activity on campus. In practical terms we will be holding meetings and events to facilitate this; for example last year we ran a

Cut the Rent Demo outside Goldsmiths, Richard Hoggart Building
Photo Credit to Eva Crossan Jory

Last year at Goldsmiths, Cut The Rent was formed with two main goals; the first being that all halls should meet the standards set by housing charity Shelter and the second seeking to make halls affordable by capping rent at half the average maintenance loan, the equivalent of £100.20 per week.

We all know rent is expensive in London, but universities should be doing their best to create and offer affordable housing. Rent at Goldsmiths halls has risen significantly this year with some halls increasing by £50 a week with only vague aesthetic improvements to show for it. Last year our halls cost on average 75% of the maintenance loan; it's clear that most students can’t afford these unsustainable prices.

Since starting, the Cut The Rent campaign have put the views of students first. They've put the real story of halls, from exploding toilets to rat infested kitchens, into the public domain so students can see that increasing fees doesnt lead to improved accommodation. Instead of falling on deaf ears, these stories have inspired a movement determined to change the status quo. Since the campaign started, the National Union of Students has vowed to